Training

This chapter describes the different training activities and the tools you need to customize them.

  • Age groups
    • Selecting an age group — Select the most appropriate age group for your students.
  • Targets
    • Unit of Measure for Speed — Choose to measure typing speed in words per minute or characters per minute.
    • Targets — Set targets that best suit your students, according to their age or curriculum.
  • Preparation
    • Basic Advice — Have your students watch a short video showing the seven principles to follow in order to rapidly learn how to type effectively.
    • Initial Test — Have your students complete the initial test in order to have a benchmark against which to measure their progress.
  • Exercises and Tests
    • Accessing the Exercises and Tests — Access the list of exercises and tests in order to configure them.
    • Order of Exercises and Tests — Choose a sequence of activities in the proposed order or a sequence in no particular order.
    • Locking Exercises and Tests — Lock exercises and tests to prevent students from accessing them before the time is right.
    • Progress Monitoring — Take a look at a student’s record to see the status of the activities in their training program.
  • Improvement Activities
    • Have your students complete the training exercises as often as possible so that they improve their typing of certain characters or train the fingers that need more practice.
  • Texts
    • Assigning a Collection of Texts to a Group — Assign a collection of texts to a group.
    • Accessing the Collections of Texts — Access the collections of texts to edit them or add a new one.
    • Adding a Collection of Texts — Add a new collection of texts that can include as many texts as you want.
    • Editing a Collection of Texts — Edit your text collections to suit your needs.
    • Progress Monitoring — Take a look at a student’s record to see the status of the activities in their training program.
  • Games

    • Accessing Games — Encourage your students to access the games from the Move on tab.
    • Monkeys in Jeopardy — Have a look at this game, which consists of typing series of characters in order to extend a life-saving vine to monkeys that are threatened by a storm.
    • Cosmik Ball — Have a look at this game, which involves typing single characters in order to keep a cosmic ball captive.
    • Characters to Type — Ask your students to select the area of the keyboard containing the characters they would like to type more easily.
    • Difficulty Levels — Suggest that your students select the level of difficulty that is most challenging for them.
    • Top Players — Remind your students to consult the various top players lists if they want to compete against the other students in the class.
    • Granting Access to Games — Restrict access to the games.
  • Letters to parents
    • By automatically generating a personalized letter, you can let parents know that their child is learning to type with Typing Pal. The letter invites parents to support their child in continuing the training activities at home.